This is fascinating to me….. never, ever, ever in a million years would I have thought I’d even *consider* starting a blog but in recent years I have also dreamt of staying home with my kids (I’m also a nurse!!) AND being financially set (and then some?!). The problem is that this whole concept is so foreign and terrifying to me. This post is awesome and seems to have an incredible amount of step by steps instructions. But, I do have a few questions. What was your (or a realistic) timeline from when you very first started your blog to when you could financially do that as your “real job”? And now that you’re established I understand you have passive income but what does your schedule look like? How much time do you have with your kids? I picture having to be at the computer for 6 hours a day?!?! I just wish I could actually see what someone like you does to create your posts and “work” 😉. Thank you, and I’m sorry this comment was so long!!
My policy with affiliate marketing is to only recommend products that I have used or have had someone close to me who I trust use and recommend. This is again something that will add weight to your recommendation and increase conversion – but it’ll also help your reputation and stop you from promoting products that are rubbish. Recommend a product that doesn’t work and your own reputation and any trust you’ve built up with those who follow your advice will suffer. Don’t sacrifice your own brand for the sake of a few quick dollars.
I would personally agree with linkshare.com as a great affiliate marketing platform to join as a publisher. Here’s why. Back in 2005 when I knew nothing about affiliate marketing and was using blogger.com as a free blogging platform without any experience whatsoever and joining Walmart.com as my first official affiliate program, I was able to insert Walmart affiliate in its in my blogger blog and earn a $72 commission. I was onto affiliate marketing for life from there.
If you’re using an affiliate network, the right affiliates will be able to easily find you through the built-in search feature. For example, a simple search for the word “apparel” on AffiliatePrograms.com produces a variety of search results about the best affiliate programs for 2017 under that category, along with reviews. Also, feel free to niche down your search into ‘running’ or ‘crossfit’ to pinpoint a few affiliates who understand your customer base well. They may have a blog that caters to your specific target audience.
Posts without value are posts that will cause your audience to lose interest and the goodwill of your audiences, rendering your efforts of using social media for affiliate marketing useless. For example, on my social media platforms I like to have 80% of my posts as entertainment or education purposes only and only 20% of my posts have anything to do with promotions.
The popularity of affiliate programs has a huge impact on how online brands spend their money on the development of their business. This approach proves to be working, as it is cost-effective: you only pay when you reach a sale. In fact, 81% of brands already leverage affiliate marketing using third-party entrepreneurs and influencers. That is why almost every online store has to consider this when trying to compete in the world of eCommerce.
On a monthly basis, I’ve had success devoting an hour or two to a couple of activities. First, I send out a monthly newsletter to my affiliates (you can typically do this within your affiliate app). In the email, I let them know about anything new that’s cooking – and encourage everyone to log into their affiliate dashboard so that he or she can share the news.
The bulk of the offers that I promote pay around $20-$40 per lead, but there are others that pay more and less. However, you don't want to get caught up solely on what an offer pays because how well it converts is just as important. For example, if you have an offer that pays $9, but if it converts at 2X or more of a $20 offer, then it will perform about the same and possibly better. At the same time, if you have an offer that pays $90 and it converts poorly, it may not even be worth promoting.
×