Not that long ago, consumers would find a product that looked cool, maybe talk to a salesman, and make a purchase if it appeared to fit their needs. Now, consumers are flocking online, well before they decide to make a purchase, to do in-depth research and find the very best product available. Unboxing videos and product reviews have exploded into the buyer’s journey, and there is a huge opportunity to capitalize on this research phase through your YouTube channel. Consumers are simply looking for reviews that they can trust to help them make the best choice possible on the products they need. It’s incredibly important to find something that you are truly passionate about and provide people with a detailed review of why this is the best product available. Doing this will build trust and foster a community that organically grows in followers.
To build on that last point about commissions in the previous section of this post, it’s important to offer generous commission rates, especially if you’re just starting out. For example, proven top fashion sites offer commissions of up to 10%, and some early-stage stores would benefit from offering even more. When it comes to affiliate marketing for beginners, providing great monetary incentives is a key way to build trust and scale up your advertising efforts by scoring great affiliates.
When you include an affiliate link in your description be sure to say somewhere that it is an affiliate link. This can be in the form of a disclaimer at the bottom of your video description or as a parenthetical notation right next to the link. Also be sure to say what product it is for. Nobody likes being tricked into landing on iTunes or Amazon when they think they are going to an artist’s fan page or the ultimate zombie survival blog.
eBay’s Partner Program is similar to Amazon’s, you just select the products you want to promote from their catalog and post the links. The program even has link generators, making it easier to insert them in your YouTube content. You can earn as much up to 70% of the total revenue for each transaction, and there are trackers for viewing your earnings.
Visitors to your website are already familiar with your brand to some extent, making them potential candidates for your affiliate program. Plus, this is where nearly a quarter of affiliate marketers find out about new programs. Promote your affiliate program on your site with a link in an out of the way but still easily accessible place like your footer, and create a page dedicated to the program and highlighting the benefits of joining. Here’s how Pooch Perks does it.
For starters, you’d benefit greatly from a website to publish relevant content. There’s no need to go overboard and hire a developer. WordPress and fast, light, and affordable hosting will suffice. All you need is hosting. If you are wondering what website hosting is good for your affiliate marketing blog, Nick, web hosting expert at Hosting Tribunal considers HostGator as one of the best value-for-money choices based on its speed, uptime, price, compatibility with WordPress and customer services.

According to Drew Hendricks of Inc.com, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn have proven to be high converting channels of social media selling. But not every channel connects with every audience. They each have their own character and each demand a tailored approach. With over a billion active monthly users, Facebook is the largest social media network. If you want to get in front of the largest social media audience, Facebook is your destination. Twitter is great for learning about consumers’ likes, interests and online activity. So to educate the market about your brand and to learn more about your own customers, establish a Twitter presence. Whereas LinkedIn attracts people engaged in business and thought leaders from different industries. Target LinkedIn to reach B2B prospects.

I would not ever tweet specifically to sell a product, I don’t think there’s enough money to be made to justify that kind of annoying behavior. On the other hand I frequently tweet books I’m reading if I find them interesting. Before I knew about affiliate programs I frequently linked to products just to illustrate what I was talking about, now whenever I do that I use affiliate links. If any traffic does end up coming from my post I figure I deserve a piece of the pie for it, but I certainly wouldn’t go around posting things just trying to make money, that goes back to the best advice I’ve found for twitter newbies, “don’t be a dick.”

While you need to be careful about sharing photos under a copyright protection, you can still find many copyright free images. For example, you can go to Google Images, click on the little gear icon in the upper right corner, click on “advanced search” then only show images that are not protected by copyright. In almost every industry, you will be able to find a ton of images you can use or even edit for your own purposes.


Obviously you shouldn't be spamming your videos everywhere, but making detailed posts/responses about your content that you think other users might find interesting. The more times your videos are shared, the more YouTube will see your video as useful and give it a boost in it's rankings. You'll also gain traffic from those shared videos, some can even be evergreen.
Given that I am still in reading and preparation phase, I am mainly interested to overlap my niche with real life interests so I could have motivation to produce content on regular basis. Two that I am highly interested are PC parts and Fitness. I am aware they are too general subjects with lot of sites doing the same, but my idea is to produce constant review on PC parts, Laptops, Mobile devices, Accessories all in different categories, create lists like top5 or 10 under XX budget etc. Similar approach I would use if I I decide to go with Fitness path and divide content training advice, review of fat loss methods, supplementation, nutrition etc. I am aware that this will be a long journey and that it can pass few months before sales start to kick in and that’s the risk I am ready to take. My questions are:
In the beginning, the tracking capabilities of affiliate marketing felt revolutionary: marketers were giving trackable links to publishers, with the publisher earning a commission every time a reader made a click or a purchase. Leveraging this newfound transparency opened up an opportunity for publishers to monetize their content without having to sell banner ads and pop-ups, while brands could now have a trackable, results-driven strategy for their marketing spend.
In this example, a blogger might put this link on their blog to try to get their readers to click through to your “blue widget” page and hopefully buy something. If the visitor who clicks on this link actually buys something, affiliate tracking software will automatically (usually – depends on what system you are using) pay your affiliate a percentage of the sale.
These guys post in-depth product reviews and comparisons that are some of the best around. If you want an informative breakdown of whether you should buy something or not, The Wire Cutter is an amazing resource. Their Twitter feed links directly to these reviews along with great pictures, and it’s easy to see why they have more than 80k followers — they are a major player in affiliate marketing.
The bulk of the offers that I promote pay around $20-$40 per lead, but there are others that pay more and less. However, you don't want to get caught up solely on what an offer pays because how well it converts is just as important. For example, if you have an offer that pays $9, but if it converts at 2X or more of a $20 offer, then it will perform about the same and possibly better. At the same time, if you have an offer that pays $90 and it converts poorly, it may not even be worth promoting.
×