Organic traffic, on the other hand, are those visits which are tracked by another entity — usually because they have arrived through search engines — but also from other sources. Hubspot’s definition emphasizes the term “non-paid visits,” because paid search ads are considered a category of their own. But this is where the lines between direct and organic start to get little blurry.

Not sure exactly why, perhaps I used a number too big and since my page is about classifieds, it probably seemed too much to browse through 1500 ads, I assume? Somewhat like you would post 800 tips for better ranking? Don’t know, will try to change things a bit and see how it goes, but you really gave me some new suggestions to go for with this article. Thanks again 🙂
Thanks Jure. That actually makes sense. Exactly: I’ve tested lowering the number of tips in a few posts and it’s helped CTR/organic traffic. One thing to keep in mind is that the number can also be: the year, time (like how long it will take to find what someone needs), % (like 25% off) etc. It doesn’t have to be the number of tips, classified ads, etc.
Search engines (especially Google) are unpredictable. No matter how adept you are at using the AdWords keyword planner or how targeted your SEO strategy is, you can never be completely sure which of your blog posts or even your landing pages will perform the best — and which keywords they’ll rank for when they do. You’ve got to hit publish, then wait to see how the results shake out over time (and it can take months for a post to gain, or not gain, the traction you’re looking for).
Also take this opportunity to add answers to questions that you often hear from customers or prospects. You may want to speak with sales representatives or others in your organization who have the most customer contact. They’ll be able to tell you for what customers are looking, what type of questions they have about your products or services, and what are the most common barriers. This is all valuable information that you can incorporate into your content strategy.
I find it interesting that you talked about nutrition supplements for athletes. I am very close to launching such a product for enhancing aerobic exercise performance in women (ie. improved times in a 3 mile run).. The product contains no stimulants or exotic herbs. In fact three of the five ingredients are well known minerals, but in forms not found in most multi-vitamin-mineral supplements. The research behind the product comes from me. The credibility behind the research is that I am a professor of human nutrition with over 100 research papers. Now, the trick will be to use my connections and credibility in a business savvy way.
SEO is still the biggest organic traffic source today, but the amount of time and effort that it takes to rank high enough to use that traffic is just too big for beginners. That doesn't mean that you have to give up on search engine optimization - always keep that in mind and optimize every article on your website. You have to use other ways to drive organic traffic to your website and post great content to catch people's attention. Not only you will start growing community, but you will start naturally ranking on Google higher.

I simply make the point that this research is still being influenced by what works for search. This is a mistake. For example, there are some topics that don’t need 2,000 words to provide the reader with in-depth value. So, if you take a topic that only requires 1,000 to cover it well and stretch it to 2,000 words, what do you think will happen with your user engagement?
Optimise for your personas, not search engines. First and foremost, write your buyer personas so you know to whom you’re addressing your content. By creating quality educational content that resonates with you>r ideal buyers, you’ll naturally improve your SEO. This means tapping into the main issues of your personas and the keywords they use in search queries. Optimising for search engines alone is useless; all you’ll have is keyword-riddled nonsense.
As pointed out, they are certainly not the same, but it might not be a bad idea to track and report on the direct traffic. If there has been outreach done and the company is mentioned in print with a URL, direct traffic (along with some search traffic on the URL or business name itself) is likely to go up. If your email newsletters are not tagged, they're likely to show up under direct traffic. Depending on your role, some of what you do under the greater SEO/inbound marketing role can show up under the direct traffic.
To give you an idea of just how much money is being spent on paid search, take a look at Google. Google's AdWords program is the most used pay-per-click (PPC) advertising program available today. While the tech giant owns YouTube and Android, among hundreds of other profitable brands, AdWords accounts for roughly 70% of their revenue -- which speaks wonders for its effectiveness.
You can’t build a sustainable growth strategy based solely on paid users. However, in this day and age, it also isn’t reasonable to expect a fraction of organic users to deliver sufficient revenue for your business. With non-organic traffic, you are in the driver’s seat, and you can drive scale by relying on data to optimize your campaigns, while with organic traffic you can increase your ROI. You need a combination of both in order to propel your app into fame and success.
To explain in a way that may be easier to visualize, the ranking of a website determines what website will pop up first through an engine search. For instance, when you search for a local restaurant that serves a certain cuisine, the rankings of websites fitting that description will determine which sites show up first through that search. This goes beyond restaurants of course and applies even further to any variety of global businesses, companies, or blogs that possess their own domain. Implementing effective SEO strategies serves as an essential method of increasing the number of visitors to a site by focusing on multiple relevant components, discussed further below.
Organic optimization helps your business attract the right kind of traffic. While marketing companies might sell you on the concept of traffic increase, failure to distinguish the value of that traffic is a major red flag. Consider the notion that a large percentage of your traffic was lured to your site for the wrong reasons. If you are a looking to generate leads for your business, but your traffic is visiting to learn “how to” do something, the visitors will never turn into customers. With DFW SEO, we ensure that your traffic is relevant by optimizing your pages with the right keywords. By doing so, the result will be:
Social is no longer just about conversation and content; it’s now an established channel for customer acquisition, remarketing and engaging existing fans/customers to support retention programs. It may be relatively immature compared to search and email marketing but it’s a channel in which most ecommerce teams are ramping up investment (people and tools).
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