Thanks Jure. That actually makes sense. Exactly: I’ve tested lowering the number of tips in a few posts and it’s helped CTR/organic traffic. One thing to keep in mind is that the number can also be: the year, time (like how long it will take to find what someone needs), % (like 25% off) etc. It doesn’t have to be the number of tips, classified ads, etc.
BrightEdge research supports that a blended approach is best for delivering high performing content. Not only will combining organic and paid search increase website traffic, but it will offer a bigger return on the investment. Take Retail, Technology and Hospitality industries, for example — organic and paid search combined make up more than two-thirds of their total revenue.
Many people also search specifically for services within their area. Utilizing keywords such as “wedding photography Atlanta” instead of just “wedding photography” can help you face local competition better. Setting up a Google My Business page is also a tool that will help your business pop up in localized searches. It’s free to set up, and requires a physical address for your business.

Input your post’s url into SEMrush to discover the keywords that it’s already ranking for. Are you ranking just off the first page of the SERPs for any specific keywords that have a high search volume? Take a look at keywords which are ranking in positions 2-10 and try optimizing for these first — moving from third to first position for a term with high search volume can drastically increase organic traffic. Plus, it’s easier to bump a page up the SERPs when it’s already ranking for that keyword.
It is important to target keywords that your target consumer is likely to search for while looking for the product or service that you offer. For example, if you are an accounting firm located in Miami you would not want to target a general keyword such as “accounting firm.” Not only is it a very difficult keyword, but also you will be attracting visitors from all over the globe. Instead, you would want to target a more precise keyword such as “accounting firm in Miami” or “Miami accounting firm.”

Content that is more comprehensive—think 2,000 words or more—tends to rank higher on search engines such as Google. But Google isn’t just looking at content length; your content has to be of good quality and provide value to your user. It takes time to develop all that content, and it doesn’t always make sense to make every new post a 2,000-word masterpiece.


One of the great things about online content is that it can always be updated and expanded. While you should be strategic in your content creation, you can also think about blogging as an opportunity to test new ideas. You don’t have to make every post perfect and comprehensive right from the start. As your experience with and knowledge of a particular topic grows, you may have opportunities to return to older posts and improve upon them. Or as the industry evolves and customer needs change, you can update your content accordingly. Not only does this give you updated content for search engines, it shows your readers that you’re on top of trends in your industry and that your website content is fresh, and therefore trustworthy.
This is a pretty basic question, but I'm wondering if there is any meaningful difference between the terms Organic and Natural traffic? My assumption is that Organic traffic refers to traffic that comes in through search engines, whereas Natural traffic would also include people directly entering a URL, coming in through social referrals, and through links on other sites in addition to organic search. Is this correct, or are there other definitions for what these terms mean?

This community is full of opportunities if you're a fashion-based retailer. One of the major advantages is the fact that they add links to each of the products that they feature within their outfits - the links go directly to product pages. This is the holy grail for ecommerce SEO, and the traffic those links will bring through will convert at a very high rate.

Organic search is a method businesses use when they want to rank high on a search engine’s results page without having to invest in an ad campaign. Usually, this method involves using optimization practices on web pages and blogs and linking strategies, and conducting industry keyword searches that search engines view as valuable. Search algorithms are not entirely known, but marketing experts carefully study results to gather insight into how Google and other search engines rank pages. Some of the organic search engine optimization practices also include using relevant keywords on a page title, regularly posting optimized-blog articles to your site, and engaging with customers on social media platforms. This process takes time. The more you post and optimize your pages, the higher your results, as search engines see your content as relevant and trustworthy.
Make sure to review your updated content for accuracy and freshness. Rewrite any content that’s out of date, update any screenshots or examples if necessary, and add whatever insight you’ve gained since you (or someone else) first wrote the content. Do whatever else you feel is necessary to increase the overall quality of the post. That may also mean adding more internal links, more detailed instructions, or additional references as necessary.

Organic traffic is driven from search engines. Search engines like: Google, Yahoo & Bing. Billions of users around the world use these search engines to find sites like yours every single day. After an order is placed on our site, we evaluate your website to ensure that the keywords that you have chosen are relevant and keyword enriched. Then, our team of highly trained SEO and marketing professionals will process your order & your traffic will be on the way!
Social is no longer just about conversation and content; it’s now an established channel for customer acquisition, remarketing and engaging existing fans/customers to support retention programs. It may be relatively immature compared to search and email marketing but it’s a channel in which most ecommerce teams are ramping up investment (people and tools).
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