It increases relevancy: Siloing ensures all topically related content is connected, and this in turn drives up relevancy. For example, linking to each of the individual yoga class pages (e.g. Pilates, Yoga RX, etc) from the “Yoga classes” page helps confirm—to both visitors and Google—these pages are in fact different types of yoga classes. Google can then feel more confident ranking these pages for related terms, as it is clearer the pages are relevant to the search query.
If you own a business, a website, or a social media platform, you have most likely heard terms like organic SEO, inorganic SEO, organic traffic, inorganic traffic, paid SEO, unpaid SEO. These are very common terms in the online marketing field. Perhaps, you are torn between organic SEO vs. inorganic SEO. But, when many people hear the terms organic and inorganic, they envision the product section in a supermarket. That’s because modern consumers are aware about and educated on the differences between organic and inorganic products as well as their impact on their lives. Nevertheless, many websites and business owners are yet to know what exactly differentiates organic SEO from inorganic SEO.

As you probably know, search engine optimization refers to the process of using different on-page and off-page strategies to move a website higher on a search engine’s results list. The general goal of SEO is to bring more traffic to a website, and since Google’s top links get the most clicks, moving up the rankings is one of the best ways to get more views from people who are searching for topics that you cover.
This topic seems actually quite controversial. Google answered the question by what could be taken as a denial. But their answer was kind of open to interpretations. And on the other hand, there are studies (one of them from Moz) that showed linking out has an impact. So, how can you be so assertive? Is it something that comes out from your own experiments?
I feel I have great content…but most of it is within my email marketing campaign instead of my blogs. I’ve used my blogs to include links to my email marketing campaigns to lead to my product. In your opinion, should my blog content be the priority? I find my marketing emails sound more like a blog than just a “tip” or a reason to grab people to my list.
SEO is still the biggest organic traffic source today, but the amount of time and effort that it takes to rank high enough to use that traffic is just too big for beginners. That doesn't mean that you have to give up on search engine optimization - always keep that in mind and optimize every article on your website. You have to use other ways to drive organic traffic to your website and post great content to catch people's attention. Not only you will start growing community, but you will start naturally ranking on Google higher.
Traffic data is a great way to take the temperature of your website and marketing initiatives. When you are writing and promoting blog content on a regular basis, you can use this information to track results and correlate these efforts to actual ROI. Be sure to look at traffic numbers over long-term intervals to see trends and report on improvement over time.

Bill is a content marketing and SEO expert with over 4 years experience working as a full-time consultant. He works specifically with businesses struggling to get the results they want from their blog and content marketing strategy. Using his unique connections in the business world, he helps ecommerce brands grow their audience through influencers, backlinks, on-page search optimization and technical SEO –– all rank his brands higher on Google. You can work with him to do the same for your brand here.
Thank you Brian. I am so brand spanking new to all this and i am really struggling with understanding it all. I have tried to read so many thing to help my website and this was the first article to really make sense however Being an urban, street menswear online store i feel like my niche is too broad?.. Ahh Feel like I am drowning maybe I need to do your course! Thanks again for the read I will be doing a lot more thats for sure

Basically, what I’m talking about here is finding websites that have mentioned your brand name but they haven’t actually linked to you. For example, someone may have mentioned my name in an article they wrote (“Matthew Barby did this…”) but they didn’t link to matthewbarby.com. By checking for websites like this you can find quick opportunities to get them to add a link.


Now, it is not that these sites are not interested in Google users. In fact, they have hired us to help them increase their share. However, they are getting so much traffic from sites like Facebook that it seems there is less urgency about attracting this traffic and less willingness to change the site to meet organic standards. Not long ago, sites would urgently and unquestioningly abide by Google’s standards to court that traffic.
Great content. Although I disagree with ‘the best times to post’ section. It is important to understand your audience. For example, if your brand/business is in high school, there will be low engagement until 2-5 when they are out of school. I highly suggest using instagram analytics (a subsidiary of facebook analytics) which gives you all of the details on when your followers are active. https://www.facebook.com/help/788388387972460
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