Traffic data is a great way to take the temperature of your website and marketing initiatives. When you are writing and promoting blog content on a regular basis, you can use traffic data to track results and correlate these efforts to actual ROI. Be sure to look at traffic numbers over long-term intervals to see trends and report on improvement over time.  
Organic SEO is an inbound marketing technique, and anyone in the marketing industry will tell you that inbound marketing has the highest ROI potential of any marketing technique. Because organic SEO is “earned”, it levels the playing field for businesses of all sizes and scopes. While PPC awards keyword ad space to the highest bidder, SEO rewards websites that make consistent efforts to enhance user experience and present an ideal website for visitors. More examples of SEO include:
Danielle is a marketing professional with extensive experience in PR and communications. After a few years in the non-profit and education sectors, she found her true calling in Tech when she joined the ranks of Blonde 2.0 in 2014, where she had the pleasure of heading PR efforts for some of the best tech companies out there, such as Waze and Playtika.
This information hits the mark. “If you want your content to go viral, write content that influencers in your niche will want to share.” I love the information about share triggers too. I’m wondering, though, if you could share your insights on how influencers manage to build such vast followings. At some point, they had to start without the support of other influencers. It would seem that they found a way to take their passion directly to a “ready” world. Excellent insights. Thanks for sharing.
Unfortunately, this particular client was fairly new, so as a result, their Moz campaign data wasn’t around during the high organic traffic times in 2015. However, if it was, a good place to start would be looking at the search visibility metric (as long as the primary keywords have stayed the same). If this metric has changed drastically over the years, it’s a good indicator that your organic rankings have slipped quite a bit.

However, this may not be the case for your company or your clients. You may start by looking at keyword rankings, and realize that you’re no longer ranking on the first page for ten of your core keywords. If that’s the case, you quickly discovered your issue, and your game plan should be investing in your core pages to help get them ranking again for these core keywords.
If you were to ask someone what the difference is between direct and organic website traffic, they would probably be able to warrant a good guess, purely based on the terms’ wording. They might tell you that direct traffic comes from going straight into a website by entering its URL into a browser or clicking a bookmark, while organic traffic comes from finding the site somewhere else, like through a search engine.
To sum up all of this information, even organic traffic, like direct traffic, has some gray areas. For the most part, though, organic traffic is driven by SEO. The better you are ranking for competitive keywords, the more organic traffic will result. Websites that consistently create content optimized for search will see a steady increase in organic search traffic and improved positioning in the search results. As a marketer, it is important to look at your keywords and high-ranking pages to identify new SEO opportunities each month.  
To explain in a way that may be easier to visualize, the ranking of a website determines what website will pop up first through an engine search. For instance, when you search for a local restaurant that serves a certain cuisine, the rankings of websites fitting that description will determine which sites show up first through that search. This goes beyond restaurants of course and applies even further to any variety of global businesses, companies, or blogs that possess their own domain. Implementing effective SEO strategies serves as an essential method of increasing the number of visitors to a site by focusing on multiple relevant components, discussed further below.
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