For my Adsense plugin which you can get here https://wordpress.org/plugins/adsense-made-easy-best-simple-ad-inserter/ I’ve created a PRO version (https://www.seo101.net/adsense-made-easy-pro/) that is available to those that sign up for my mailing list. It’s not much but it gets me 5 to 6 subscibers a day. And best of all I know exactly what my subscribers are interested in… WordPress and Adsense:)
Backlinks are basically Authoritative linking. Which means someone else says about your site that it is in an indication of a particular keyword or you have authority in a particular market is indicating that their readers can go and find more helpful information from certain places on the web and they do that by creating these authoritative links which also called backlinks. The more of high quality, authoritative links that you have, Google considers this as you are being incredible in the market. Your website can be authoritative by having other website owners to link to your website, Then Search Engine algorithm will consider your site and you will get higher boost to your SEO and your site will likely get higher ranking and the more of this authoritative link. Blog Commenting is a great way to get backlinks to your website. Step 1. Find relevant and high traffic blog in your niche. Step 2. Actually read the post, what all it’s about. Step 3. Just leave relevant comment to the topic, then simply place your link in the comment.
A slowly loading website does two-way damage. Firstly, Google detects the crawling pace, which hurts your site’s organic ranking. Secondly, a slow speed poisons customer conversion rate and amps up the abandonment rates for your business. The second factor links back to the first one, as visitors don’t engage with your website, resulting in a loss to search engine ranking.
I’ve always been a believer that hard work gets the best results, and in practice it always ends up being true. On the web it’s no different. If you want more organic traffic, you have to work for it. That means giving your best effort every time, going after opportunities your competitors have missed, being consistent, guest blogging strategically, and staying on Google’s good side.
Everyone wants to rank for those broad two or three word key phrases because they tend to have high search volumes. The problem with these broad key phrases is they are highly competitive. So competitive that you may not stand a chance of ranking for them unless you devote months of your time to it. Instead of spending your time going after something that may not even be attainable, go after the low-hanging fruit of long-tail key phrases.
Hi Chris, "Good content" means a couple of things - good for readers and good for Google. Good content for readers means that the content answers questions, provides value, offers solutions, and is engaging. You want to keep the reader on the page and on your website for as long as possible. To make good content for Google, you have to provide the search engine with a set of signals - e.g., keywords, backlinks, low bounce rates, etc... The idea is that if you make good content for readers (engaging, valuable, actionable, and informative), your content will get more engagement. When your content gets more engagement Google will see it as good content too and put it higher in the SERPs. Making "good content" is about striking that balance. Let us know if that answered your question!
Social is no longer just about conversation and content; it’s now an established channel for customer acquisition, remarketing and engaging existing fans/customers to support retention programs. It may be relatively immature compared to search and email marketing but it’s a channel in which most ecommerce teams are ramping up investment (people and tools).

There is some discrepancy with details in regards to what each of these terms could be used for. Some see these terms as basically synonymous, as organic traffic does indeed refer to web traffic directed through search engines. Organic traffic can also include direct and social media links. Natural traffic can also be used to describe the same element, with links from search engines or any website. When traffic is generated through users directly entering a URL, this is usually referred to as “direct” traffic. 
Paid social can help amplify organic content, using social network advertising tools to target the audience. Using the rugby example, on Facebook you could target people who like other leading rugby fan pages. I recommend testing paid social campaigns to promote key content assets like reports and highlight important news/announcements. With a small budget you can quickly measure amplification impact.

A meta description is a short blurb about the particular page of your website. This is a great place to insert keywords easily. However, you also want to include helpful information for potential site visitors to draw them into clicking on your website. This blurb will appear in search engine results pages under your H1 title tag and URL of your webpage.


Social is no longer just about conversation and content; it’s now an established channel for customer acquisition, remarketing and engaging existing fans/customers to support retention programs. It may be relatively immature compared to search and email marketing but it’s a channel in which most ecommerce teams are ramping up investment (people and tools).
Use H2 and H3 subheads to introduce those new sections (as well as restructure your existing content). H2 and H3 subheads help search engines understand your content better as well as lead it to be featured in search. This article (with great examples) explains how to better word those subheads to capture more organic ranking opportunities (including using keywords in them and sticking to the question format).
A slowly loading website does two-way damage. Firstly, Google detects the crawling pace, which hurts your site’s organic ranking. Secondly, a slow speed poisons customer conversion rate and amps up the abandonment rates for your business. The second factor links back to the first one, as visitors don’t engage with your website, resulting in a loss to search engine ranking.

Create a spreadsheet to monitor your results. It’s a good idea to make a note of the post’s original post date, original word count, the date updates were made, and the new word count. Also note the number of post views during the 30 days prior to your changes, along with a summary of changes made and any other important metrics you want to track. Check your traffic after 60 days to see if traffic has increased.
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