PeerFly only has a limited number of products at the moment, but they have tremendous momentum and are growing by leaps and bounds. Their payout rates aren’t spectacular, but everything is upfront and transparent, and affiliate satisfaction is very high. PeerFly is perfect for authentic marketers who want to offer high-quality products to their visitors as opposed to “get rich quick” schemes and opaque offers.
Every single brand has a different commission rate. So Amazon’s will go up to 10% depending on how many products you sell in a month. But some brands will only do 5%, and some will do 50. Some will do 20. So you’ll have to look in the terms and conditions of that advertiser to see what kind of commission they get and whether you want to work with them or not.
In the past, bloggers could only promote affiliate products via Pinterest indirectly by linking to a blog post that contained affiliate links. But now, if you are a blogger who has already joined affiliate programs for your favorite retailers in your niche, you can now share your affiliate links directly on Pinterest. That means that instead of creating a post to drive readers to, you can now pin and image of a product you love with your affiliate link on Pinterest. You can see an example of one of my “affiliate pins” below.
These guys post in-depth product reviews and comparisons that are some of the best around. If you want an informative breakdown of whether you should buy something or not, The Wire Cutter is an amazing resource. Their Twitter feed links directly to these reviews along with great pictures, and it’s easy to see why they have more than 80k followers — they are a major player in affiliate marketing.
Early on in my stay, I was assigned the Affiliate Marketing beat, and I found that one of the best ways to familiarize myself with the industry in an efficient manner was through social media, specifically Twitter. I had bookmarked a ton of blogs and affiliate network websites, but it was the simple act of following various Twitter accounts (and occasionally talking with them through direct messages) that really helped me get a feel for the world of performance marketing.

Early on in my stay, I was assigned the Affiliate Marketing beat, and I found that one of the best ways to familiarize myself with the industry in an efficient manner was through social media, specifically Twitter. I had bookmarked a ton of blogs and affiliate network websites, but it was the simple act of following various Twitter accounts (and occasionally talking with them through direct messages) that really helped me get a feel for the world of performance marketing.
The main distinction now between affiliate and influencer marketing is simply the channel itself and the way the influencer is paid. Affiliate marketing sees affiliates paid based on web traffic performance (CPA) while influencer marketing sees influencers often paid flat fees upfront in return for social traffic performance. Brands now have visibility into the same metrics for both strategies and can access indicators of performance and traffic via Google Analytics for web-based publishers and Instagram Insights for social based publishers. Despite these similarities, influencer and affiliate marketing are still referred to as two separate strategies and are often managed by different teams in the same organization.
With all of my blog posts, I have the consistently scheduled to share on social media and on Pinterest. This keeps the content in front of my audience. I use the social media scheduling tools Post Planner and Tailwind for this. Many affiliate programs also have great affiliate managers that will send out information with special promotions that you can share. If there isn’t a big sale or promotion going on, I will still try to feature certain high-converting posts on Pinterest, to my email list, etc.
Video is the most powerful form of advertising. It allows consumers to see and understand products before hitting the purchase button, and as visual creatures, we can’t help but watch a well-made, captivating video. Just think about it — video has only been around for about a century, but now it’s everywhere. We have Snapchat videos, 3D movies, videos on our Facebook walls, and more.

I had that experience as well. Getting high monthly page views doesn’t necessarily translate to more traffic. You also need to focus on the conversion rate of your pins. For each pin, divide the number of clicks by the number of close ups. That gives you the conversation rate. You want that number to be at least 50%. Make a note of the pins that have the highest conversation rates and see what design elements they have in common. They create more pins like them. Hope that helps.
VigLink works a bit differently than other affiliate programs in that it is specifically designed for bloggers. Instead of affiliates picking and choosing which merchants to work with, VigLink uses dynamic links that automatically change to work with merchants that VigLink has determined are offering the highest conversation rates and/or commissions at any given moment.
Plan your video before you make it. Rambling is one way to make a long, over-saturated video that can cause your bounce rate to sky rocket (people clicking off the video). Make a script to follow (but give yourself for some improvisation) and also don't be afraid to cut out content you think is uninteresting or not relevant. No one wants to hear about your Gran's sixtieth birthday bash on a video unboxing the latest sneakers.
Affiliate marketing isn’t the only strategy to have evolved recently. Influencer marketing has undergone a makeover of its own, becoming more transparent, more streamlined and more effective. If you have felt in the past that influencers do not offer the same transparency or sales-driven results as affiliate publishers, you might be pleasantly surprised by recent updates and changes in the industry.
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