Shopify is an eCommerce solution similar to PayPal or Stripe.com—it allows you to make sales, purchases, and payments online. For someone running an affiliate program, this is obviously a necessary piece of the puzzle. Not only do you need to get paid for your sales, but you need your customers to be able to make purchases and—much as you’d like to forget this part—you also have to pay your affiliates!
People love to buy…we love to consume great content. However, we have to be warmed up before we do it. On social networks, it’s the relationships that sell, not the message. It’s really up to you, though. You can spam people and make a quick buck (maybe), or you can build credibility and build a successful business. In my opinion, taking the latter route is much more efficient.
Understanding the effectiveness of your affiliate program is crucial for sustainable success. Identifying your top-performing affiliate marketers, for example, can help you double-down on what’s working. Why are they so effective? Were they very loyal to your brand before becoming an affiliate? If yes, then maybe you need to contact your most frequent shoppers about joining the program.
One of my tips would be don’t do it. People on Twitter hate spammers so why would you want to become one of them. I think anyone trying to market a product just so they can make some cash off of it is a Twitter spammer. I thought most of us talked about at this would be bad for Twitter and a Twitter would have to start suspending people to stop it.
Now, once you start following people, you will notice your own follower numbers increasing naturally. Many people enjoy seeing who is following them. If A dog lover sees my profile (@DogFoodScoop) they will probably click on my profile to see who I am. They will then see the link to my website and if they visit my site, they will be greeted with literally hundreds of dog food reviews. Sometimes, they will even find it so helpful that they in turn will share links on their own Twitter or Facebook feeds. It seems super simple (and it is), but simply following others who would be interested in your niche topic is good enough to gain a pretty good following of your own. It’s a good rule of thumb to expect about 25% to 30% of people to follow you in return for you following them.
Affiliate marketing now faces a critical transition: with social media becoming increasingly shopper-friendly, bloggers are dropping their websites for Instagram fame. After previously relying on “publishers” to drive traffic for clients as part of an affiliate program, affiliate-focused agencies must now quickly get up to speed on new tactics, social platforms, and strategies to serve brands who are now seeking more comprehensive results from a diverse range of channels – not just web. With consumers swiping up on Instagram Stories to shop the looks of their favorite social media influencers, the convenience of shopping via social media is increasingly becoming the norm for shoppers looking to purchase on-the-go. Those affiliate marketers who are still only investing in website publishers and click-through metrics now run the risk of missing broad swaths of new customers and business on social.

"Social media affiliate marketing often provides a community feel," explains Murphy. "An example of this is mums who publish deals for other mums." Social media has become the new community center, or coffee shop - it's somewhere in which people spend a lot of their spare time, and form friendships sometimes greater than those they have in the offline world.
Affiliate links were once just links. Remember that. The purpose of having links in any content (and the reason why affiliate marketing works) is because they are useful. They make purchasing the things we want easier. Don’t abuse your online platform by filling your page with spammy, pointless affiliate links. Be sure to create that quality content and only include them when and where they add value. It’s a balance that, when found, makes your viewers happier and earns you more commissions.
Hi Tasha and Abby, very intersting post . Tasha, I’ve noticed that you’re using Amazon links too. Doesn’t Amazon only allow affiliate links on your own website? No social networks, no emails, no ebooks, no nothing else… I’m not a native English speaker, so maybe I misunderstood the terms (they are complicated as hell for me). But good to know that with a less strict company it’s possible to use affiliate links on Pinterest too. Thank you for the info!
Let’s take a look at a real-life example. I’ll show you how I did keyword research to promote my affiliate pin for the Pin To Profits – Affiliate Marketing Course. The course teaches beginners how to make money on Pinterest using affiliate links. Before I put myself in my audience’s shoes, I make a note of the key information about the course that I need to convey.
I love working with Tasha! She came up with some great logo ideas for my virtual assistant business and patiently worked through my indecisiveness, offering multiple options and revisions until we decided on just the right design. Tasha also put together a beautiful branding board with my colors and style that I can reference any time. Now I’m having her work on graphics for my social media to go with my new brand. She does terrific work and I’m so glad I found her!
About Youtuber Chris Mitty is an Affiliate Marketer and Technology Professional from the UK. He has sold a variety of products online, and works with some of the worlds largest organisations as a freelance consultant. Chris has studied and implemented a number of carefully thought out strategies, which has helped him build a successful affiliate marketing business off the back off Technology. He shares his advice on how to achieve the same level of success, if not better!
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