On Facebook and Instagram, taking part in a conversation is generally done in a more indirect way, but on Facebook you can share links and posts and make a point about what you have heard or read, while on Instagram you can write about the reason you are posting on a topic, and put another side of the story onto a public forum that welcomes different viewpoints.
Their YouTube channel has some fantastic videos about PC-building and they list all of the parts used in their video descriptions. You can follow a handy link to the full list of components, where you can find out how much they cost and where to get them. The fact that they have over 180k people subscribed to their channel is almost all you need to know. 
This is so well put together, thank you! I’ve been spinning my wheels trying to figure out what affiliates to work with in my niche. My target audience is bloggers, and much of my content is free knowledge on how to grow a blog, but pushing a sale is just not what I want to do. But with this list I can really see that there are a lot of options to choose from. I do have an account with shareasale already, so I’m going to start there and see what other companies will work for my audience!

"Social media affiliate marketing often provides a community feel," explains Murphy. "An example of this is mums who publish deals for other mums." Social media has become the new community center, or coffee shop - it's somewhere in which people spend a lot of their spare time, and form friendships sometimes greater than those they have in the offline world.
Posting your YouTube videos and affiliate links on other sites related to the products you are promoting also works.  Forums are a particularly good choice since they are frequented by people looking for product information. Don’t just drop your video links in the threads. Engage in conversations with the other members to know what exactly they are looking for. This gives you a better opening to push your affiliate links and get them to click and buy.
To be a leader in affiliate marketing, networks and agencies must recognize that advertisers are seeking more than just one-off leads or incremental sales. They want advocates and storytellers who can engage potential shoppers, demonstrate vertical expertise, and strengthen brand loyalty to inspire a long-term relationship. Influencers allow brands to take advantage of all the benefits of affiliate marketing, including transparency and guaranteed exposure while adding the power to connect with shoppers and strengthen brand affinity. Affiliate marketing is a proven channel, strengthened by its access to data and quantifiable results. The opportunity is now for both advertisers and their affiliate networks to embrace influencer marketing and make it as cost-effective and transparent as they have affiliate marketing. In this case, the whole – affiliate marketing and influencer marketing – is definitely greater than the sum of its parts.
This is so exciting! As a blogger, I’m always looking for ways to maximize my revenue streams. Thank you, Tasha (and Abby) for sharing this valuable info. BTW – I am taking Tasha’s Blog Boost Bundle courses AND Abby’s Book Boss course and both are excellent and full of valuable advise! Thanks to you both for taking the time to create these incredible courses!
Hi Tim! I’ve talked to Amazon about this as well, as have many other bloggers I know personally. Each one of us is getting different answers. It’s VERY frustrating. Many have been told as long as their Pinterest account is listed in their profile, it’s fine. For those that haven’t, I’ve pointed out during my calls to Amazon that you can pin Amazon affiliate products directly to Pinterest from the rewardStyle interface, so it’s silly for them to tell anyone that they can’t do it directly from their Amazon Associates account. But of course, with Amazon giving different bloggers different answers, you have to do what you are comfortable with. Or, if in doubt, pin Amazon products via rewardStyle if you are a member 🙂 Hope that helps.
If you’re scratching your head wondering what affiliate marketing is, no worries! I, too, had never heard of affiliate marketing until about 9 months ago. Now, it’s one of my main sources of income. In a nutshell, affiliate marketing is when you promote the products of other companies to earn a commission on sales. Let’s say you love MAC Cosmetics and run a makeup blog. You can sign up for MAC’s affiliate program and get a unique link you’ll use to promote your favorite foundations, brushes, lipsticks, and so on. If someone purchases some lipsticks through your link, you earn a percentage of the sale. Affiliate commissions typically range between 3%-40%.
The popularity of affiliate programs has a huge impact on how online brands spend their money on the development of their business. This approach proves to be working, as it is cost-effective: you only pay when you reach a sale. In fact, 81% of brands already leverage affiliate marketing using third-party entrepreneurs and influencers. That is why almost every online store has to consider this when trying to compete in the world of eCommerce.

Getting accepted into a good affiliate program, such as Amazon Associates, requires you to have a website that is live. You cannot register for the Amazon affiliate program using your YouTube channel. You need to have your own website and the website needs to be informative and relevant to the products that you will promote. This is because a team from Amazon will check your website for eligibility for their affiliate program. Unless you have a good website set up, you shouldn’t apply for their affiliate program, since most of the time your application will be rejected.
If you’re using an affiliate network, the right affiliates will be able to easily find you through the built-in search feature. For example, a simple search for the word “apparel” on AffiliatePrograms.com produces a variety of search results about the best affiliate programs for 2017 under that category, along with reviews. Also, feel free to niche down your search into ‘running’ or ‘crossfit’ to pinpoint a few affiliates who understand your customer base well. They may have a blog that caters to your specific target audience.

I would not ever tweet specifically to sell a product, I don’t think there’s enough money to be made to justify that kind of annoying behavior. On the other hand I frequently tweet books I’m reading if I find them interesting. Before I knew about affiliate programs I frequently linked to products just to illustrate what I was talking about, now whenever I do that I use affiliate links. If any traffic does end up coming from my post I figure I deserve a piece of the pie for it, but I certainly wouldn’t go around posting things just trying to make money, that goes back to the best advice I’ve found for twitter newbies, “don’t be a dick.”
If you use another URL shortening service, whether your Associate ID is included can really vary from service to service. Generally speaking, when using an outside URL shortening service, your Amazon Associate ID must be included BEFORE you shorten the URL. You should be aware that some services will add their own Associates tag to the shortened URL or remove your Associates tag altogether. Also, please be aware that some shortening services use their shortened URLs to frame the Amazon site. If the links you get from any service do this, or otherwise do not resolve to the www.Amazon.com domain in the address bar, you cannot use them in the Associates Program and you will not earn referral fees from those links.
It is important to note, however, that StudioPress is now a subsidiary of WPEngine which is the company that actually does the web hosting on which StudioPress’s Genesis framework runs. The affiliate program only works with choosing the StudioPress framework and themes, not the actual hosting on WPEngine. WPEngine has a separate affiliate program for its hosting services, which yes, is a bit confusing.
You can benefit from social media in two ways: by promoting the content which you create or putting links directly in your social media posts. Chances are you already use social media to promote your blog or website (if not — what are you waiting for?) But let’s face it – in this day and age people don’t always want to click a link to go to a website where you have to click more links. Nearly 50% of affiliate-referred traffic originates from a mobile device. And you know better than me, most of the time on your phone you’re checking Twitter or Instagram, not reading lengthy blog posts.
But that’s kind of the balance is you’ve got to balance like I’m developing an audience, but I need to make it sustainable. So sometimes it makes great business sense for you to go ahead and use an affiliate. And other times you’re like, you know what? Maybe not on this video because my main goal for this video is just to get it to rank really high.
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