FriendFinder is an adult-friendly network of dating websites that has a terrific affiliate marketing program, both in terms of customer service and commission rates. Because they rely heavily on affiliates to recruit new members, they treat their affiliates like true business partners. They have a solid reputation for payment and security, and have frequent special offers. Checking into your affiliate account at FriendFinder is always a fun experience, and often a profitable one.
With all of my blog posts, I have the consistently scheduled to share on social media and on Pinterest. This keeps the content in front of my audience. I use the social media scheduling tools Post Planner and Tailwind for this. Many affiliate programs also have great affiliate managers that will send out information with special promotions that you can share. If there isn’t a big sale or promotion going on, I will still try to feature certain high-converting posts on Pinterest, to my email list, etc.
SkimLinks is probably best for bloggers who want to write content around the affiliate link rather than add affiliate links to existing products. SkimLinks offers a lot of tools to compare commission rates and offers in order to customize your content to optimize your income. Once nice aspect of SkimLinks is that it offers lots of products for non-US creators, including popular UK brands like John Lewis and Tesco.
Skillshare is a platform that provides it's users with high-quality video tutorials that they can then apply in real life. With Skillshare, you can earn $10 in commission for every new customer that signs up for a membership or a free trial, and the software that Skillshare uses can track your referrals for 30 days. So long as you can demonstrate that you have at least one channel and audience that is aligned with Skillshare's brand. Skillshare is a particularly popular site at the moment, and shouldn't be hard to suggest to your audience, as they offer excellent tutorials and free trials.
Depending on your niche, your audience will prefer certain platforms. I know, all these names like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Reddit (don’t forget about Youtube and Snapchat), might sound a bit overwhelming. But you’ll find out that people that read your content and share your interests usually hang out on two or three of these. Again, a social media listening tool could help you analyze which platform is popular among your audience.
Very useful info, and thanks for the heads-up about Etsy not allowing affiliate links on Pinterest! Have you ever tried advertising on Pinterest, i.e. paying Pinterest to promote your pins? I was wondering if that could be lucrative with affiliate marketing, where the margins are always lower than when you have your own product to sell. I’m also wondering if it would be lucrative to advertise on Google, Facebook and Youtube (found this guy who supposedly made a lot of money that way – https://moneytestimonials.com/crestani-free-webinar/ ). I’ll probably do my own experiments with this but if you have experience in this area I’d be very interested to hear about it!

This is fascinating to me….. never, ever, ever in a million years would I have thought I’d even *consider* starting a blog but in recent years I have also dreamt of staying home with my kids (I’m also a nurse!!) AND being financially set (and then some?!). The problem is that this whole concept is so foreign and terrifying to me. This post is awesome and seems to have an incredible amount of step by steps instructions. But, I do have a few questions. What was your (or a realistic) timeline from when you very first started your blog to when you could financially do that as your “real job”? And now that you’re established I understand you have passive income but what does your schedule look like? How much time do you have with your kids? I picture having to be at the computer for 6 hours a day?!?! I just wish I could actually see what someone like you does to create your posts and “work” 😉. Thank you, and I’m sorry this comment was so long!!
Write a description using your main target long-tail keyword and 2-3 related keywords from the search results. With a regular pin, your main target keyword should be in your blog post title. meta description, pin title, and pin description. Affiliate pins don’t have a blog post title or meta description so you just need to focus on the pin title and pin description. This below is my affiliate description. Notice how I effortlessly weave in the keywords? After writing your description, read it over and make sure it sounds natural. Below, I used #affiliate, but now I use #ad to be more explicit.
Getting accepted into a good affiliate program, such as Amazon Associates, requires you to have a website that is live. You cannot register for the Amazon affiliate program using your YouTube channel. You need to have your own website and the website needs to be informative and relevant to the products that you will promote. This is because a team from Amazon will check your website for eligibility for their affiliate program. Unless you have a good website set up, you shouldn’t apply for their affiliate program, since most of the time your application will be rejected.
Enthusiasm. You don’t need to be bubbly and happy throughout your video — you should be yourself. But you should not speak in one tone and completely deadpan. Try to get people excited about whatever it is you’re video is about. Think of the things YOU like to see in YouTube videos and then try to do that the best you can. Remember, you will never please everyone, but you don’t have to.
You have to remember that on Twitter, you only have 140 characters to work with. (At least for now–who knows what will happen with this 280 character limit in the works.) Your link takes up 23 characters of your tweet, even when you don’t use a link shortener, so you have 117 to say what you want to about the product and disclose that it’s an affiliate link. So you need to be short, sweet, and to the point.
Affiliate marketing tends to do exceptionally well on social media when you promote a high-quality offer. In such a situation, everyone wins. The customer wins since they obtain an awesome deal; the affiliate marketer wins since they earn a heavy commission on driving traffic to the website, earning sales and the product manufacturer wins by generating revenue for what they have created.

VigLink works a bit differently than other affiliate programs in that it is specifically designed for bloggers. Instead of affiliates picking and choosing which merchants to work with, VigLink uses dynamic links that automatically change to work with merchants that VigLink has determined are offering the highest conversation rates and/or commissions at any given moment.


Make sure you actually put yourself out there and interact with the people you are following. You don’t have to comment on every post they make (that would be a bit stalkerish), but when you see something they posted is interesting or helpful, let them know! You can even re-tweet it or give them a special mention on your Twitter feed. Just be genuine. If someone isn’t providing helpful and useful information, remove them from your list and follow someone else (remember, people will do the same to you). Only follow those who are truly helpful. If they send you a direct message or respond to a comment, reply back! Forming a relationship like this can literally turn into money later, so get out there and network with the people you are following. Don’t just give them sales pitches for your website, product, or service – that will come later. For the most part, just interact and have fun. As a direct and indirect result of your friendliness, your own following will continue to grow.
Review: Since Refersion charges based on the quantity of affiliate sales processed in a given month, I recommend them for medium/higher ticket item stores, or stores with an average checkout of $30-$60 or higher. At that level, their fee structure becomes very attractive because you're only paying incrementally for sales, and not for traffic, whereas many other apps charge based on the number of visits regardless of where they originate from. Whereas if you're a high volume low ticket store, you might prefer paying for traffic and getting unlimited sales.
You have to remember that on Twitter, you only have 140 characters to work with. (At least for now–who knows what will happen with this 280 character limit in the works.) Your link takes up 23 characters of your tweet, even when you don’t use a link shortener, so you have 117 to say what you want to about the product and disclose that it’s an affiliate link. So you need to be short, sweet, and to the point.
By creating a favorite things page, you can direct interested parties from all of your social platforms to this page when they ask about anything you love or use. AND you can include that link in your YouTube description knowing that it can continually be updated and improved so present and future viewers of your videos will be able to see the updated version at all times.
If you’re running WordPress, I use a plugin called Thirsty Affiliates to cloak, manage, and track my affiliate links (you have to pay Thirsty Affiliates for their add-ons if you want extra features). The free version is still good… just install the plugin and find the “Affiliate Links” tab on the left of your dashboard. Add the link name and destination URL, save it, then copy the cloaked version of the URL so you can add it to your Youtube video annotations.
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